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  2. image: Download

    The Newsroom may be smug and problematic and not great at depicting its female characters but I’m inevitably going to get pulled into the show’s second season. Which, at the least, did start off better than some of more struggling aspects of the first. The tone is very different and far more tense in the second, which I enjoy. Fingers crossed. 
But Maggie’s hair… Jesus. 

    The Newsroom may be smug and problematic and not great at depicting its female characters but I’m inevitably going to get pulled into the show’s second season. Which, at the least, did start off better than some of more struggling aspects of the first. The tone is very different and far more tense in the second, which I enjoy. Fingers crossed. 

    But Maggie’s hair… Jesus. 

     
  3. Everything about this latest episode of Girls is too painful for words. Thanks, HBO, for the brutal kickoff to my week. The character of Adam is perhaps the most fascinating arc and the one I’ve enjoyed most, making this all the harder to watch. I’m still on the fence about the OCD element of the last couple episodes…perhaps a little forced? We’ll see. 

     
  4. 13:52 16th Jan 2013

    Notes: 32

    Reblogged from ohlivyuhuxtable

    Tags: GirlsHBO

    image: Download

    I unambiguously loved the first new episode of Girls. So smoothly done, hilarious, and a solid set-up for pulling me right into the show’s second season.

    I unambiguously loved the first new episode of Girls. So smoothly done, hilarious, and a solid set-up for pulling me right into the show’s second season.

    (Source: frakyeahquotes)

     
  5. The weakest part of ‘The Newsroom’

    Seriously, it was this guy: 

    The character of Don Keefer is such an excessively grating straw man in every sense, both personally and professionally, that it stretches any bit of credibility at times and is hard to take seriously. He’s built to be disliked. He won’t go to dinner with the cute assistant’s parents after dating for four months. He ignores any hint of “real” news when it starts breaking. He resists even pretending to pay attention or prepare. There are reasons why this makes sense on paper (power plays, the way things are done here, etc.) but in real life, I can’t ever imagine a journalist telling people to knock it off the way this character does, especially shocking because this character is lauded for his meteoric rise to EP in so short a time. How and why did it happen? None of the skills or insight were remotely on display in The Newsroom’s premiere. Every moment he was on screen was simply a moment to groan and wait for the Good Guys to knock this punk down a peg. He’s just silly—like the way he ignores news based on the color of severity is just crazy and tonally off. 

    His only redeeming moment? He did slam the character of Will pretty good about halfway through the episode and talked about how Will’s personality (his grating, over-the-top, worse-than-Bartlet’s-worst style) was the reason he left the show. That was a fine and honest few words. Who knows though. Maybe he’ll be entertaining as hell. 

     
  6. Despite winning a Peabody Award for excellence and public service in television for Season 2, [The Wire] never won an Emmy.

    Andre Royo [Bubbles]: It was crazy. We saw our audience get bigger and bigger, and then come the SAG awards, the Emmy Awards, the Golden Globes—nothing. We were like, “Well, what the fuck is going on?” And David Simon, he was so cool. He was like “Fuck the awards, I’m not about that. I’m about telling a good story.” He was on interviews, like, “We don’t need that.” And some of us, in the back of our heads were like, “Yo, stop sayin’ we!”

    Amy Ryan [Russell]: We would shake our heads, going, “Why are we being overlooked?” It was maddening, but it also didn’t matter, because we knew.

    Wendell Pierce [Bunk]: That’s politics. That’s the politics of outside New York and L.A. That’s the politics of race. We had a running joke where after every nomination, this one woman in the hair department would be so hurt, you know, “You guys were so good!” I was like “Janet, sorry, but you’re on a black show!”

    J.D. Williams: It kind of goes with the lore of the show now.

     
  7. image: Download

    Why The Wire, which premiered 10 years ago this Saturday, was truly a product of its time. 

    Why The Wire, which premiered 10 years ago this Saturday, was truly a product of its time

     
  8. What a small shame. I like the project’s cast—Greta Gerwig, Maggie G, Chris Cooper, etc. Noah Baumbach was apparently heading up much of the adaptation, which strikes me as rather appropriate. The challenges make sense: 

    Word is HBO brass liked the performances but the decision came down to adapting the book’s challenging narrative, which moves through time and cuts forwards and back. While that works in the novel, it proved difficult to sustain in a series and challenging for viewers to follow, hampering the potential show’s accessibility.

    The adaptation I’m looking forward to more, however, is Jen Egan’s A Visit From the Goon Squad, which HBO is also developing. Yet won’t that narrative be even more of a challenge? I see that running into its own complications. The Powerpoint chapter alone!

     
  9. Buzz-worthy things colliding! 

     
  10. 23:05 17th Apr 2012

    Notes: 2

    Tags: HBOGirls

    image: Download

    I gave in and watched the first episode of HBO’s Girls yesterday. It’s watchable enough but yikes, these characters definitely give off some unlikeable vibes at times—very unaware and drifty and helpless and steeped in celebrated, obnoxiously-taken-for-granted privilege. But there’s some potential, perhaps. I liked this breakdown of 20 elements from most realistic to least and see a lot of validity to it. My real problem is that while I think the show nails a few things tonally rather well, the core attitudes are largely unsympathetic, at least in the premiere. 

    I gave in and watched the first episode of HBO’s Girls yesterday. It’s watchable enough but yikes, these characters definitely give off some unlikeable vibes at times—very unaware and drifty and helpless and steeped in celebrated, obnoxiously-taken-for-granted privilege. But there’s some potential, perhaps. I liked this breakdown of 20 elements from most realistic to least and see a lot of validity to it. My real problem is that while I think the show nails a few things tonally rather well, the core attitudes are largely unsympathetic, at least in the premiere.