1. image: Download

    Under the Skin is a strange, strange film… A visual and audio triumph of aesthetics, at the very least, but also puzzling and so overwhelmingly bare. Scarlett is great. I’m still not sure where I fall on the movie as a whole. 

    Under the Skin is a strange, strange film… A visual and audio triumph of aesthetics, at the very least, but also puzzling and so overwhelmingly bare. Scarlett is great. I’m still not sure where I fall on the movie as a whole. 

     
  2. Too da loo…?

    A Mrs. Doubtfire sequel is apparently happening

     
  3. All that reading The New Yorker's long Scarlett Johansson profile really left me with was a supremely strong desire to check out this new film called Under the Skin

     
  4. But now Jodorowsky the filmmaker is legitimately back. “Jodorowsky’s Dune,” a documentary by the American director Frank Pavich about Jodorowsky’s two-year quest to adapt the Frank Herbert science-fiction novel, and “The Dance of Reality,” a trippy but big-hearted reimagining of the young Alejandro’s unhappy childhood in a Chilean town, will each make its stateside debut this spring (on March 21 and May 23). As the rapper Kanye West, whose “Yeezus” tour was inspired by “The Holy Mountain,” put it last November to a packed (and very likely perplexed) house at Brooklyn’s Barclays Center: “I don’t know if … y’all ever heard about Jodorowsky, the director… . Y’all don’t know who the [expletive] he is… . Everybody copied off him… . And there’s gonna be [expletives] in this arena in a few months dancing all sloppy off him.”
    — 

    New Jodorowsky is coming

    I’ve seen both El Topo and Holy Mountain and would be very down to check out anything new he’s come up, for curiosity’s sake alone. 

     
  5. image: Download

    nevver:

Tell me everything

Great screenshot out of the Wikileaks documentary that Alex Gibney put together. It’s one of the messages from Chelsea Manning, which I thought was one of the more touching and sad narratives that Gibney delved into. 

    nevver:

    Tell me everything

    Great screenshot out of the Wikileaks documentary that Alex Gibney put together. It’s one of the messages from Chelsea Manning, which I thought was one of the more touching and sad narratives that Gibney delved into. 

     
  6. Before Midnight was one lovely, painful movie. I went to E Street Sunday with someone to see it finally after being curious for weeks. The narrative was pieced together so naturally and elegantly. It’s talky like both preceding films, inevitably, but manages to work. And it works much better than the other two, I think, due to the added depth that comes from all the years that go into this film. What a devastating dissection of a couple, seriously. 

     
  7. I could be very easily convinced to rewatch all of Antonioni’s films from the ’60s and ’70s.

     
  8. Before “Frances Ha,” this seemed to be Baumbach’s fate: to pursue a literary career through the medium of film, while ruefully noting that, in the nineteen-seventies, someone who had made work like this might have had a reputation as a mainstream director. “Greenberg” is an explicit attempt to channel the work of Philip Roth and Saul Bellow. “With the title, I was thinking of Portnoy or Herzog,” he told me. “I can’t say this well, but I felt I could do cinematically what I loved about those writers and those books.”

    Gerwig noted that Roth and Bellow often told a story “relentlessly from one point of view.” In film, though, “when you put a camera on something, you’re here and that’s there.” Instead of inhabiting a man’s psyche, you had to put up with it, across the room. “Greenberg” is a good and funny film, but one wonders if Baumbach has always fully recognized the cinematic challenge of presenting difficult people, even as he meets the literary challenge of acute, merciless portraiture.

    — 

    Via a Noah Baumbach profile in The New Yorker from earlier this year

    This may well be why I like Greenberg as much as I do. The main character’s obnoxious but I can’t look away. And I do find the dilemmas in that movie far more painfully real than what I found in Frances Ha. I also am a total sucker for the novels of both Roth and Bellow, whatever that says about me. I rewatched most of the Greenberg in spare moments from the last 24 hours, not that there’s been all that many spare moments. Tonight I went to Politics & Prose and saw George Packer read, which was excellent. 

     
  9. The Congo, filmed in infrared.

     
  10. Alex Gibney tends to make documentaries I like. I’m looking forward to his latest, called We Steal Secrets and on WikiLeaks. Julian Assange has always interested me, and I’ve devoured the longer profiles on him. The WikiLeaks saga also has a lot to say about journalism, I think, and how it’s changing and able to change. Here’s what Gibney had to say on that in The Atlantic

    Well I think that one of the messages of the film is that journalists are very important in this process, and in many ways I think that the WikiLeaks story ends up reasserting the value of traditional journalism. That having been said, I think a lot of people go astray in saying that, well, Assange is not a journalist and WikiLeaks is not a journalistic organization. That may be true. But I think it’s viable to think of WikiLeaks as a publisher. That’s maybe a better description of it. And in that context, I think it’s a little offensive how the government has tried to marginalize WikiLeaks by saying it’s got nothing to do with journalism.