1. Do we fall a little bit in love with our anxiety, are we attached to it? It gives a kind of sharpness, a crisp focus to our days that might otherwise be passed in a haze. Communing with phantom terrors sharpens our pleasure; it lends drama or spark to routine. An overdeveloped sense of precariousness makes you appreciate some pretty basic things. If you have clocked a few rigorous post-midnight hours colourfully elaborating the various ways you might be dying, come morning you will be over the moon pouring cereal for a child.

    The truth is that crisis in general, the sense of warding off calamities, of juggling many complicated things, of being harried and hectic and stressed out, can be perversely pleasurable. People hate insomnia but there is, for those who have a lot of it, often a kind of weird secret pleasure in it too. Even though you may hate the exhaustion, you find yourself sort of savouring it, like certain kinds of hangovers: it offers its own vividness. The rawness, the strung-out-ness, the oversensitivity to the world, the ache, they are all sort of pleasing in their own dark way. They make you feel like you are intensely experiencing the hours, not just slipping through.

     
  2. Scarcely anyone in this oddly prim chronicle is driven by greed. Self-preservation, yes, but greed is nonexistent in the book’s narrative—a tic that’s roughly akin to Jules Verne writing Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea without bothering to note that his protagonists are surrounded by ocean water.
    — 

    Alex Pareene on Andrew Ross Sorkin

    That said, I still have wanted to read Too Big to Fail

     
  3.  
  4. PRI just dropped This American Life. How in God’s name could they think that’s in their best interests? What a brand. Bound to get picked up in no time.

     
  5. Bold, dismaying move, Associated Press. I do not approve.

     
  6. 21:21 19th Mar 2014

    Notes: 206

    Reblogged from nogreatillusion

    Tags: journalism

    Never trust anyone posing as a tour guide. Learning things is hard. Do the work.

    Never trust that part of you that wants a tour guide. All of us are tempted by the Cliff-Notes. Decline them. Sometimes you must wander through The Louvre.

    Never try to look cool and learn something at the same time. You must have an awkward phase. All of us would like to skip that awkward phase. That is not how it works. Here is how it works: Get your ass in the water. Swim like me.

    — 

    Ta-Nehisi Coates  (via anthonyking)

    Ta-Nahesi, just being great. 

     
  7. Tuesday was George Plimpton’s birthday. It’s been 11 years since he died now. 

     
  8. 23:26 13th Mar 2014

    Notes: 13

    Reblogged from hoomananvar

    Tags: journalismrobotshelp

    image: Download

    
The future of journalism just got a little more robotic
A recent study by a pair of Oxford professors estimated that nearly half of all workers in the United States could eventually lose their jobs due to automation. While journalists have been faced with round after round of layoffs in recent years as a result of the Internet’s decimation of newspapers’ traditional business models, the fear that robots might take their jobs probably isn’t even on most reporters’ radar.

Well, it was good while it lasted…

    The future of journalism just got a little more robotic

    A recent study by a pair of Oxford professors estimated that nearly half of all workers in the United States could eventually lose their jobs due to automation. While journalists have been faced with round after round of layoffs in recent years as a result of the Internet’s decimation of newspapers’ traditional business models, the fear that robots might take their jobs probably isn’t even on most reporters’ radar.

    Well, it was good while it lasted…

     
  9. What’s next for Black Twitter? No one is sure, although Clayton argues that it’s not likely to vanish as soon as mainstream America finds something else to obsess over.
    — 

    The Associated Press

    I remember when Choire Sicha first posted about his discoveries of relating to this on The Awl several years ago. This AP story has a lot of crazy lines in it. Like: “Catchy hashtags give clues that the tweeting in question is a Black Twitter thing.” Good to know. 

     
  10. Vox, the new venture bringing together Ezra Klein, Matt Yglesias, and others, just launched its first trailer. Slick video.

    I go back and forth on how much credence I give to their vision of how people consume news. Context is important, but I’m not completely sure that the magical words “context” and “understandable” will transform the more complicated and dry news topics out there and how society at large treats and comes to understand them. Those things will help, sure, and Ezra did a tremendous job at that with Wonkblog. I understand his temptation to broaden that scope. But I don’t necessarily see the problem with some topics being less palatable to the average reader… My publication is based and its business model premised on specialized readers who care about wonkier legal and policy details, for instance. In any case, I’m curious to see how Vox tries and absolutely welcome a publication trying to assume that role.