1. Today, there’s no way to tuck that box under your gym bag in the back of the closet. The echo of your relationship lives in every stroke of the key, in every alert notification noise, and in every single pixel. Exes live in auto-correct, in your Instagram feed, in your Gchat window, and in your very own social media history. Before we became dependent on the Internet for everything, including life management, taking control of the box was easier. Or so I’ve heard. Unfortunately, my life has always happened on the Internet. I was 17 when I got Facebook. For the entirety of my adult life, I have been an online tech reporter. In many ways, I have no control over the box.
     
  2. One of my ex-boyfriends would, as standard, roll over and check his BlackBerry as his first post-coital act. After a while, I started to do the same. There was an unanswered question: what have I missed? It became a serious issue, something we subconsciously asked beforehand – what would we miss if we had sex now? Is there time for this? Would it be more convenient later?
     
  3. More amazed that “Real Facts from Snapple” is a Tumblr. Sunday night made. 

    More amazed that “Real Facts from Snapple” is a Tumblr. Sunday night made. 

     
  4. In the afternoon, the silver-haired, bespectacled Nakamoto stepped outside, dressed in a gray sport coat and green striped shirt, with a pen tucked in his shirt pocket. He was mobbed by reporters and told them he was looking for someone who understood Japanese to buy him a free lunch.

    Newsweek estimates his wealth at $400 million.

    "I’m not involved in Bitcoin. Wait a minute, I want my free lunch first. I’m going with this guy," Nakamoto said, pointing at a reporter from AP. "I’m not in Bitcoin, I don’t know anything about it," he said again while walking down the street with several cameras at his heels.

    He and the AP reporter made their way to a nearby sushi restaurant with media in tow, before leaving and heading downtown.

     
  5. image: Download

    Photo of a Comm Daily reporters’ reunion following the FCC Chairman’s Dinner Thursday, over at the Washington Hilton. What a killer evening. More than 1,600 people attended the dinner, devoted to jokes from new FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler. This was my second time attending the event, put on by the FCBA, and it’s always lively and interesting—a real who’s who of the tech and telecom world of D.C. 
Beyond that, I’m amazed by the sheer amount of news in the last week and in the week ahead. I thought December was supposed to be quiet, but I’m headed to the Hill every day of this coming week for one thing or another. 

    Photo of a Comm Daily reporters’ reunion following the FCC Chairman’s Dinner Thursday, over at the Washington Hilton. What a killer evening. More than 1,600 people attended the dinner, devoted to jokes from new FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler. This was my second time attending the event, put on by the FCBA, and it’s always lively and interesting—a real who’s who of the tech and telecom world of D.C. 

    Beyond that, I’m amazed by the sheer amount of news in the last week and in the week ahead. I thought December was supposed to be quiet, but I’m headed to the Hill every day of this coming week for one thing or another. 

     
  6. Congress is considering making a switch in the esoteric world of CableCARDs, a move which has inspired significant support from the cable industry and major opposition from TiVo. I reported the ins and outs of this weird House of Representatives battle with another Communications Daily reporter the other week. Super wonky, but read on if you dare. 

     
  7. Resentment simmers, at the fleets of Google buses that ferry workers to the company’s headquarters in Mountain View and back; the code jockeys who crowd elite coffeehouses, heads buried in their laptops; and the sleek black Uber cars that whisk hipsters from bar to bar. … For critics, such sights are symbols of a city in danger of losing its diversity — one that artists, families and middle-class workers can no longer afford.
    — 

    Backlash by the Bay

    The New York Times on the class frustrations in the Bay Area, with a mix of photos and anecdotes that dovetail nicely in the similar piece in The Weekly Standard. I also think of the long George Packer take from earlier this year, which appeared in The New Yorker and is from his latest book. 

     
  8. image: Download

    longreads:

What happened to tech jobs in Silicon Valley

Fascinating stuff. I visited this area for the first time in October. I drove through Stanford, took a jaunt to the Google campus, a drive through the Palo Alto neighborhoods to see all the nice homes. From the piece: 

In other words, what is coming is the “new feudalism,” a phrase coined by Chapman University urban studies professor Joel Kotkin, a prolific media presence whose New Geography website is an outlet for the trend’s most vocal critics. “It’s a weird Upstairs, Downstairs world in which there’s the gentry, and the role for everybody else is to be their servants,” Kotkin said in a telephone interview. “The agenda of the gentry is to force the working class to live in apartments for the rest of their lives and be serfs. But there’s a weird cognitive dissonance. Everyone who says people ought to be living in apartments actually lives in gigantic houses or has multiple houses.”

    longreads:

    What happened to tech jobs in Silicon Valley

    Fascinating stuff. I visited this area for the first time in October. I drove through Stanford, took a jaunt to the Google campus, a drive through the Palo Alto neighborhoods to see all the nice homes. From the piece: 

    In other words, what is coming is the “new feudalism,” a phrase coined by Chapman University urban studies professor Joel Kotkin, a prolific media presence whose New Geography website is an outlet for the trend’s most vocal critics. “It’s a weird Upstairs, Downstairs world in which there’s the gentry, and the role for everybody else is to be their servants,” Kotkin said in a telephone interview. “The agenda of the gentry is to force the working class to live in apartments for the rest of their lives and be serfs. But there’s a weird cognitive dissonance. Everyone who says people ought to be living in apartments actually lives in gigantic houses or has multiple houses.”

     
  9. Lots of declassified documents available here. How’s your night?

     
  10. The block is keeping two commissioners from being confirmed. It’s a five-member commission and has run on three for months now. Here’s a critical piece from Free Press’s Tim Karr, linked above. The New York Times also sank its fangs into the hold in an editorial last week. There’s talk that Cruz and Wheeler may meet this week to try to resolve the source of the hold.